Theoretical Question for Fansubbers (kinda wishful thinking, but...)

Edmond Dantes

New Member
Let's suppose that, tomorrow, something like a real-life Zordon Wave happens, but instead of making all evil dead, it makes every human on Earth simultaneously fluent in all human languages, even giving them whatever implied secondary knowledge they would need to understand phrases like "speak of Cao Cao and he is in the room."

If there's any fansubber here, my question is this:

Would such an event make you feel like all your efforts in fansubbing were for nothing/were a waste of time, or would you still regard it as time well spent and be glad something like this happened?
 

kuroihikari

Member
Professional translators get paid, so they definitely got something for their efforts.

Man, I really wish I were an omniglot, and got every cultural reference ever. But, time, thou art so finite.
 

Alvetica

Let's Morphin
Let's suppose that, tomorrow, something like a real-life Zordon Wave happens, but instead of making all evil dead, it makes every human on Earth simultaneously fluent in all human languages, even giving them whatever implied secondary knowledge they would need to understand phrases like "speak of Cao Cao and he is in the room."

If there's any fansubber here, my question is this:

Would such an event make you feel like all your efforts in fansubbing were for nothing/were a waste of time, or would you still regard it as time well spent and be glad something like this happened?

tl:dr version: Wouldn't it be cool if the universal translators from Star Trek were real?
 

Actar

Otaku University Student
I've fansubbed and translated before and the answer is NO I would not feel that my efforts were a waste but I would mixed emotions regarding universal language. Of course, this would depend on why one fansubs to begin with. For someone like me who fansubbed to share my love for an unrecognized show, people still benefited from my fansubs before the event occurred, so I don't think my efforts were a waste. Also, while I would be glad that all works are now easily accessible and there will be no more silly arguments like liberal versus literal (ultimately to the benefit of the integrity of the original work), it would be suck to be out of a job/rendered irrelevant.
 

SamuraiEchidna

Active Member
That's a pretty good implied scenario, but here's another:

Would it change international relationships in a way that effects us?

Keep in mind, we're not just sharing episodes of Tokusatsu, we're sharing our translations of it, and all for free. If there is no translations or any changes added, then basically we'd all just be pirates. Illegally sharing these files when we should be digging into our pockets and importing the DVDs for our personal pleasure.

Even if by magic we all suddenly spoke a universal language one day, that doesn't mean Japan will want to share EVERYTHING with the rest of world as soon as possible. A lot of content creators over there have the mind set "Why should we share it with you? We made this ourselves; for Japanese audiences only. Not for you." Sometimes it takes some convincing (and perhaps money) to make the studios, companies, and whoever is involved to share their properties with other countries. You should hear the funny story about FUNIMATION trying to get the rights to the original Japanese OP and ED themes for DBZ.
 

Edmond Dantes

New Member
You should hear the funny story about FUNIMATION trying to get the rights to the original Japanese OP and ED themes for DBZ.

Can you tell me this funny story? Sounds interesting.

I seem to recall hearing other weird stories of the Japanese companies screwing distributors over. Like Castle of Cagliostro had its intro replaced with still images for one DVD release because they thought they were "helping," and the translation issues over Case Closed were at the behest of TMS supposedly.
 

SamuraiEchidna

Active Member
Can you tell me this funny story? Sounds interesting.

I seem to recall hearing other weird stories of the Japanese companies screwing distributors over. Like Castle of Cagliostro had its intro replaced with still images for one DVD release because they thought they were "helping," and the translation issues over Case Closed were at the behest of TMS supposedly.

Those of us in America can tell you about the translation nightmares of DBZ when it originally aired on television. That's because the Japanese execs didn't care about Dragon Ball's ties to the classic Chinese story or anything else important. I wonder if they even cared about Toriyama's vision at the moment. Basically, the execs wanted something that was made fast and was marketable to all the kids and teens out there. That's why so many changes and edits were made. And years later, even when FUNIMATION was trying to bring us a more uncut version of DBZ, the distributors didn't understand why. They didn't think it was necessary since America had all ready gone to a lot of effort to make their own music score and everything. The people at FUNIMATION had to tell them that fans KNEW about the Japanese soundtrack and that's what they wanted. They wanted a completely uncut version of DBZ. And as you pointed out, many titles from Japan have been screwed over from the powers that be.

In the end, even if we all somehow spoke a universe language, that wouldn't nullify cultural differences. Would make international relationships easier, but that doesn't mean we'd all be buddy-buddy with each other.
 

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