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Hey there. I've got a few questions about modding a toy:
I've modded an S.H. Figurats Kamen Rider Shin Ichigo into a character I've been working on called Kamen Rider Anansi. (This was after the antenna kept breaking and I got a replacement Shin Ichigo). I've been using
  1. 1. Regular paint (gold) + model paint (for read spider symbol)
  2. 2. Clear nail polish (as a coat over the paint)
  3. 3. Cut out sections from cardboard party stars for armor panels (also covered by nail polish)
  4. 4. Krazy Glue
  5. 5. A bead from a red Mardi Gras necklace (to give him a Kumo Otoko look)
  6. 6. Red costume cloth (for the muffler)

The results can be seem below. I seriously want to do more to make this thing aesthetically pleasing and not just junky. So I'd like to know what I'd use for modding. Do I go with spray paint? What material do I use for armor panels? Please, tell me everything I need to know.

Pictures of Kamen Rider Anansi (I apologize for the quality being ass)
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All Decade's Fault
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Pics not turning up, even when I click them. It keeps saying I'm not on AOL and therefore have not right to view them.

What type of paint are you using when you say 'regular' paint? Model kit paint, car paint, and house paint have different types and nay have different effects. I do know that for the most part that Paints that are for Warhammer gamers/modellers are usually better if you handle and play with the figure often.

Materials for armor--depends on what you want. Epoxy Putty (Apoxie Sculpt, Milliput, or Tamiya Epoxy Putty) is an option but you'd have to be good at sculpting it (it's like clay). Ir you can use bits and pieces of tank or even Gundam models and glue them to the figure if you want a more mechanical look.
 
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I've had a model kit of Cyclone/Joker sitting here for two months unbuilt simply because I don't know what paints to use. Wanted to use a Gundam Marker for the details but I hear that they're oil-based and require a finishing coat...no idea how to apply a finishing coat.

The most Glamador can manage as far as modifications go is swapping out joints and maybe some sanding or something...sculpting is beyond me.
 
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OK, let's see if I can bring some help to this thread.

For my custom jobs/Be it Transformers - custom Ranger Keys - or fixing up details on a Bandai toy, I normally and always use the following:

Krylon for some spray-painting and normal paint apps, Rust-Oleum for spray-painting, Testors for paint-apps, and finally Games-Workshop for Paint-Apps/Games-Workshop has some REALLY awesome paints that are really cheap but tre' satisfying.

I also use a clear-coat spray-paint can to make sure that the paint I had just put on is protected from scratches and smears/The clear-coat I use is mostly from Krylon again.

As for molding extra parts, I suggest getting a modeling clay that you have to keep in a big zip-lock bag and keep it moist.

That's the kind I use: I have to keep my clay moist and if I leave it out of it's bag for too long, the clay will harden like a rock.

As for keeping the molded parts on the figuart/model kit, I suggest a VERY-Good super glue.

Also, various degrees of Sand-Paper is also key for making the surface of where you wish to paint very smooth/ I say "various degrees" because there's multiple different grits of Sand-Paper and you gotta buy multiples of various grits for the various mods you may need to do.

If you guys got any questions, I'll be more than happy to answer them.
 
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What do you use spray-paints for vs. detail paints? Do you think I could find games-workshop products at a local store? I know I've seen Warhammer stuff around, but not sure if I've seen the paints.

What kind of equipment is needed for working w/ the paints? Masks, coverings, should it be done outdoors? Spraypaint kinda gets everywhere doesn't it?
 
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What do you use spray-paints for vs. detail paints? Do you think I could find games-workshop products at a local store? I know I've seen Warhammer stuff around, but not sure if I've seen the paints.

What kind of equipment is needed for working w/ the paints? Masks, coverings, should it be done outdoors? Spraypaint kinda gets everywhere doesn't it?

I usually get Games-Workshop paints at a store called Castle-Hill games/It's pretty much a treasure trove for card games, board games, Warhammer and miniatures.

When I spray-paint indoors, I suggest getting a HUGE area and cover that with a space-blanket. That thing works WONDERS as a backdrop for when I spray-paint. You should definitely get masks because some paints are very strong and they will knock you on your butt if you're not careful/I also use car-quality paint in my customs so, I know that from experience.

For the detail paints, I also suggest getting a BUNCH of different size brushes.

Why is this important? So that way, you can paint on INSANE details like for example the red circuitry details on Dark Kabuto/Though that may have been a tampograph.

For other spray-paints I use, check at places like Walmart & Fredmeyer for they got the best prices on Rust-Oleum & Krylon paints.

For the Car-Quality paint, I suggest going to a place called O'Reilly Auto-Parts and they're a paint kind called Dupli-Color. Like I said before, buy some masks to cover up the smell of the paints to avoid getting knocked out.

Any more question, guys? Again, I'll be happy to answer them.
 
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It turns out there's a games-workshop physical store at a mall ~40 minutes from me. So I'm gonna grab some paints and brushes on monday, give things a try, and get back to this thread with specific questions. I've only got the one kit so I'm not anxious to experiment too heavily with it...got a couple of old, cheap-o Gundam kits I haven't painted yet though, so I could practice on them.

The spraypaint is what worries me most. Dunno how to get an even coating, whether or not to hold the thing I'm painting with my hands, stick it to a string with putty and spin it, or what.
 
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It turns out there's a games-workshop physical store at a mall ~40 minutes from me. So I'm gonna grab some paints and brushes on monday, give things a try, and get back to this thread with specific questions. I've only got the one kit so I'm not anxious to experiment too heavily with it...got a couple of old, cheap-o Gundam kits I haven't painted yet though, so I could practice on them.

The spraypaint is what worries me most. Dunno how to get an even coating, whether or not to hold the thing I'm painting with my hands, stick it to a string with putty and spin it, or what.

Oh, I got a remedy for the model kit parts: Use alligator-clips.

Alligator-clips are these little metal clamps which are PERFECT for things like clipping onto Ranger-Key parts and model kit parts.

Also, to get an even coat of spray-paint on the part, just spray the part a little bit to try out the spray-nozzle.

If you don't like the color on the part, then continue to spray the color onto the part VERY SLOWLY. You don't to cake the spray-paint onto the part/Speaking from loads of experience here.

My advice overall is that after you place an alligator-clip onto the part/I use toothpicks to hold onto the alligator-clip, you spray the paint on the part VERY softly to make sure to get an even coating on the part.
 
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Well, I got myself a couple of brushes and a bottle of Abaddon Black paint, from Games-Workshop. And what did I discover? Hand-painting is hard man.

DSC02131.jpg


I managed to get some pretty straight lines by painting as close to the line as I could using tiny strokes and sort of...I guess 'pushing' the paint up towards the edge of the indent. But even that had a lot of little bits go over the ridge, so I took a razor and scraped away the excess.

The bigger problem is that the coat is still uneven and blotchy, as you can see in this blown up section:

DSC02130.jpg



I was told by the guy at the store that if I really want to do it right, I should apply a base coat in whatever color should fill in the cracks (I.E. black, for CJ here) with an air-brush or spray canister. But he's kind of a big figure, ya know? And it took me hours just to paint a few tiny lines....can't imagine how long a whole figure would take. And I dunno how that would fix the globbiness issue anyway.

Any protips, Zeltra?
 
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(STROKES CHIN)
Hmm...

Well, from what I see here, if you have a steady hand/One not prone to shaking, you should paint those lines up fine.

Sometimes/And a lot of the time on custom Ranger Keys, I normally use a sharpened tooth-pick to get those fine lines painted up.

Plus, try to grab just a SMALL amount of paint for that area and upon applying the paint, it should be smooth.

Also, if I had that figure? I could paint in those lines in under about 5 or so minutes at best. Another good way to paint up those cuffs is to get a dowel-rod, see how much of a gap there is between the inside of the cuff to the dowel-rod and use some tape to wrap-around the dowel-rod to seal-up the gap. The cuffs should be nice and should stay there for as along as you need them to be when you paint those bits up.

Another thing with the paint is that you can't rush the painting/Speaking from experience. After I do enough painting for that bit, I go & take a break while the paint itself dries on the part and then I go back and start painting again.

Again, if you guys need any help, let me know.
 
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